Jump to content


Pagkalikali


  • Please log in to reply
68 replies to this topic

#1 Karl

Karl

    Dalubhasang Guro (Expert Teacher)

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,135 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Germany, Chile.....
  • Nationality:Chilean-German
  • Group Affiliation(s):DTS

Posted 04 October 2007 - 08:42 PM

How accurate is thist statement here, in reality what Iwant to know is if the words used here exist???

With Spanish rule the native fighting arts adopted new terminology and new methods. Previously the art had been one in which the blade was the primary weapon. Under the Spanish the emphasis of the art turned to the use of the stick. Before the Spanish Kali was known as pananandata to the Tagalogs, Kalirongan to the Pangasinenses, among the Ilocanos as didya or kabaraon, to Visayans as kaliradman or pagaradman. The Pampaguenos called it sinawali and the Ibanag pagkalikali

Pagkalikali????????
Be True To Yourself

#2 Sitbatan

Sitbatan

    Dalubhasang Guro (Expert Teacher)

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,664 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Pangasinan
  • Nationality:Fil-Am
  • Group Affiliation(s):Filipino Fighting Arts International

Posted 05 October 2007 - 03:17 AM

QUOTE (Karl @ Oct 5 2007, 04:42 AM)
How accurate is thist statement here, in reality what Iwant to know is if the words used here exist???

With Spanish rule the native fighting arts adopted new terminology and new methods. Previously the art had been one in which the blade was the primary weapon. Under the Spanish the emphasis of the art turned to the use of the stick. Before the Spanish Kali was known as pananandata to the Tagalogs, Kalirongan to the Pangasinenses, among the Ilocanos as didya or kabaraon, to Visayans as kaliradman or pagaradman. The Pampaguenos called it sinawali and the Ibanag pagkalikali

Pagkalikali????????


we called in Sitbatan in Pangasinan.... "Bolo fighting" i dunno how accurate the info is on the other dialects.
It is reported that a man came to the Messenger of Allah (peace and blessings be upon him) and asked, "O Messenger of Allah! What should I do if someone comes to me with the intention of taking my property?'' He replied, "Do not hand it over to him.'' The man further asked, "What should I do if he fights me?'' The Messenger of Allah answered , "Then fight him.'' "What would be my position in the Hereafter if he killed me?'' The Messenger of Allah replied, "In that case you are a martyr.'' The man asked: "What if I killed him?'' The Messenger of Allah replied, “He will be in the Hell-fire.” (Reported by Muslim)
http://sitbatan.blogspot.com/

#3 weekendwarrior

weekendwarrior

    Dalubhasa (Expert)

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 232 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Iloilo City, Philippines
  • Nationality:Ilonggo
  • Group Affiliation(s):Lifetime Beginners

Posted 05 October 2007 - 03:52 AM

That's just another attempt to give and/or attach some historical credence/backing up to the SUPPOSEDLY ancient existence of "Kali."

"Kali" and "pagkali" in Ilonggo (Hiligaynon)--which is one of the major languages in the Visayas region and parts of Mindanao--means to dig earth or sand with a shovel, spade, or hands.

The term "Kali" is never ancient. It's just a latter-day coinage.

#4 Matawguro

Matawguro

    Dalubhasang Guro (Expert Teacher)

  • Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,723 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Quezon City, Philippines
  • Nationality:Filipino
  • Group Affiliation(s):FMA Forum

Posted 05 October 2007 - 12:03 PM

QUOTE (Karl @ Oct 5 2007, 04:42 AM)
With Spanish rule the native fighting arts adopted new terminology and new methods. Previously the art had been one in which the blade was the primary weapon. Under the Spanish the emphasis of the art turned to the use of the stick. Before the Spanish Kali was known as pananandata to the Tagalogs, Kalirongan to the Pangasinenses, among the Ilocanos as didya or kabaraon, to Visayans as kaliradman or pagaradman. The Pampaguenos called it sinawali and the Ibanag pagkalikali.

The passage above is taken from Placido Yambao's book "Mga Karunungan sa Larong Arnis" (Knowledge of the Game or Arnis) written in 1957. Specifically, it came from the brief history section written by the book' editor, Buenaventura Mirafuente. The history article was actually written before the book was published.

The article is the earliest written claim (that I am aware of) of the usage of "kali" to describe ancient FMA. Anyone who claims that the term "Kali" originated from Stockton, CA is ignorant of this fact.

Near I can tell, Mirafuente was not a scholar. He could have been writing about stories about Arnis prevalent at the time.

The book is written in classical tagalog, much like ye olde English. It's a difficult read for contemporary Filipinos. Like in any language, meanings of words tend to change over time. Add in the complexity of over a hundred living languages (not dialects) and,... well, you get the picture.
Robbie Trinidad
FMA Forum Administrator
Quezon City, Philippines

#5 Matawguro

Matawguro

    Dalubhasang Guro (Expert Teacher)

  • Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,723 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Quezon City, Philippines
  • Nationality:Filipino
  • Group Affiliation(s):FMA Forum

Posted 05 October 2007 - 12:07 PM

QUOTE (weekendwarrior @ Oct 5 2007, 11:52 AM)
That's just another attempt to give and/or attach some historical credence/backing up to the SUPPOSEDLY ancient existence of "Kali."

"Kali" and "pagkali" in Ilonggo (Hiligaynon)--which is one of the major languages in the Visayas region and parts of Mindanao--means to dig earth or sand with a shovel, spade, or hands.

Mirafuente's claim is that the usage of "pagkalikali" for stick fighting is from the Ibanag located in Northern Luzon. We all know how one word's usage in one locale differs from another.
Robbie Trinidad
FMA Forum Administrator
Quezon City, Philippines

#6 Pat OMalley

Pat OMalley

    Dalubhasang Guro (Expert Teacher)

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,139 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:United Kingdom
  • Interests:My family and FMA
  • Nationality:Mongrel Celt
  • Group Affiliation(s):Rapid Arnis / Doce Pares

Posted 05 October 2007 - 01:10 PM

I was led to beleive that in Cebu at least it was either known as Pangamot or Pangolisi. But I could have been misinformed as we find their is no evidence to back this up, just word of mouth.

Best regards

Pat

#7 nosyac

nosyac

    All Filipino BLADE Society

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,971 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Florida
  • Interests:Computers...
  • Nationality:Cebuano (Filipino)
  • Group Affiliation(s):Filipino Metal Alchemist (FMA)

Posted 05 October 2007 - 01:30 PM

Pagkalikali?

New word to collect for my dictionary.  Salamat.

pahabol:  

We should create a thread for "new terminology", "words" or something...

#8 Raul

Raul

    Calamondin

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,537 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Neither Here nor There
  • Nationality:Carambola
  • Group Affiliation(s):Kombat KungFu Klan

Posted 05 October 2007 - 04:06 PM

Pagkalikali????????

Attack of/from/to the armpit???????!!!!!!
Your Acts reveal What You Know and Who You are, all three are one and the same.

Klasikali on Facebook

#9 Raul

Raul

    Calamondin

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,537 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Neither Here nor There
  • Nationality:Carambola
  • Group Affiliation(s):Kombat KungFu Klan

Posted 05 October 2007 - 04:08 PM

QUOTE (nosyac @ Oct 5 2007, 09:30 PM)
Pagkalikali?

New word to collect for my dictionary.  Salamat.

pahabol: 

We should create a thread for "new terminology", "words" or something...
Yeah right, give it a title like.. "pauso".
Your Acts reveal What You Know and Who You are, all three are one and the same.

Klasikali on Facebook

#10 Matawguro

Matawguro

    Dalubhasang Guro (Expert Teacher)

  • Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,723 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Quezon City, Philippines
  • Nationality:Filipino
  • Group Affiliation(s):FMA Forum

Posted 05 October 2007 - 04:08 PM

QUOTE (Pat OMalley @ Oct 5 2007, 09:10 PM)
I was led to beleive that in Cebu at least it was either known as Pangamot or Pangolisi. But I could have been misinformed as we find their is no evidence to back this up, just word of mouth.

Best regards

Pat

"Pangamot" and "pangolisi" are generic terms, not proper names. The pan, pam, pang prefix literally means for, kamot or kamut in Cebuano (at least as I've been told) means hand (it means to scratch in Tagalog) and olisi means stick. It's basically like saying stickfighting or hand-to-hand combat.

So a conversation could go like this:

Person A: Anong ginagawa mo? (What are you doing?)

Person B: Pangolisi ito. (This is for stick fighting.)
Robbie Trinidad
FMA Forum Administrator
Quezon City, Philippines

#11 Karl

Karl

    Dalubhasang Guro (Expert Teacher)

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,135 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Germany, Chile.....
  • Nationality:Chilean-German
  • Group Affiliation(s):DTS

Posted 05 October 2007 - 05:49 PM

QUOTE (Matawguro @ Oct 5 2007, 05:08 PM)
QUOTE (Pat OMalley @ Oct 5 2007, 09:10 PM)
I was led to beleive that in Cebu at least it was either known as Pangamot or Pangolisi. But I could have been misinformed as we find their is no evidence to back this up, just word of mouth.

Best regards

Pat

"Pangamot" and "pangolisi" are generic terms, not proper names. The pan, pam, pang prefix literally means for, kamot or kamut in Cebuano (at least as I've been told) means hand (it means to scratch in Tagalog) and olisi means stick. It's basically like saying stickfighting or hand-to-hand combat.

So a conversation could go like this:

Person A: Anong ginagawa mo? (What are you doing?)

Person B: Pangolisi ito. (This is for stick fighting.)


I guess with so many languages and dialects  in the PH there  will be allways someone coming with new terminology.....or old but new for some...who knows....
Be True To Yourself

#12 Matawguro

Matawguro

    Dalubhasang Guro (Expert Teacher)

  • Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,723 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Quezon City, Philippines
  • Nationality:Filipino
  • Group Affiliation(s):FMA Forum

Posted 06 October 2007 - 03:33 PM

Just an observation, It seems that filipinos aren't really fond of terminology. It doesn't seem to be part of the filipino character to name things. Filipinos tend to think in generic term. To a filipino "Coke" is any cola flavored carbonated drink, whether it is Coca-Cola, Pepsi, or whatever. Any MP3 player is an iPod, whether it's made my Apple or not (an iPod isn't even an MP3 player by strict definition). To most filipinos "Karate" is any empty hand martial art that doesn't use gloves.

QUOTE (Karl @ Oct 6 2007, 01:49 AM)
I guess with so many languages and dialects  in the PH there  will be allways someone coming with new terminology.....or old but new for some...who knows....

This also explains the differences in terminology in FMA techniques. What Doce pares calls a wetik, Modern Arnis refers to as an abaniko for example.
Robbie Trinidad
FMA Forum Administrator
Quezon City, Philippines

#13 dan

dan

    Dan

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,058 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Canada
  • Interests:Theology, Polticis, sports, outings and ngo cho kun kung fu.
  • Nationality:Canadian-Tsinoy
  • Group Affiliation(s):Wuzuquan, BC Wu Shu, Conservative Party, BC Liberal Party

Posted 06 October 2007 - 03:43 PM

QUOTE (Matawguro @ Oct 6 2007, 08:33 AM)
Just an observation, It seems that filipinos aren't really fond of terminology. It doesn't seem to be part of the filipino character to name things. Filipinos tend to think in generic term. To a filipino "Coke" is any cola flavored carbonated drink, whether it is Coca-Cola, Pepsi, or whatever. Any MP3 player is an iPod, whether it's made my Apple or not (an iPod isn't even an MP3 player by strict definition). To most filipinos "Karate" is any empty hand martial art that doesn't use gloves.


I agree just like Colgate means everything that is touthpaste regardless of brand, Colgate is a brand name.
Every technique has a counter technique

#14 Karl

Karl

    Dalubhasang Guro (Expert Teacher)

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,135 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Germany, Chile.....
  • Nationality:Chilean-German
  • Group Affiliation(s):DTS

Posted 06 October 2007 - 06:27 PM

[quote=Matawguro,Oct 6 2007, 04:33 PM]
Just an observation, It seems that filipinos aren't really fond of terminology. It doesn't seem to be part of the filipino character to name things. Filipinos tend to think in generic term. To a filipino "Coke" is any cola flavored carbonated drink, whether it is Coca-Cola, Pepsi, or whatever. Any MP3 player is an iPod, whether it's made my Apple or not (an iPod isn't even an MP3 player by strict definition). To most filipinos "Karate" is any empty hand martial art that doesn't use gloves.
----------------------


How about when u teach, do you say this is whatever in this one is another name or you just do it and thats it???
Im Talking about the terminology.....
Thanks
Be True To Yourself

#15 Raul

Raul

    Calamondin

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,537 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Neither Here nor There
  • Nationality:Carambola
  • Group Affiliation(s):Kombat KungFu Klan

Posted 06 October 2007 - 09:17 PM

I say.. "Its called blah blah. Master called it blah blah. The Old Masters called it blah blah. I call it blah blah. Others call it blah blah. They think its blah blah but its not. You can call it blah blah if you want but strictly and technically speaking, you should call it blah blah because you know it is blah blah and not blah blah." "Comprende?!"
Your Acts reveal What You Know and Who You are, all three are one and the same.

Klasikali on Facebook

#16 bayani

bayani

    Dalubhasang Guro (Expert Teacher)

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,862 posts
  • Location:Rochester New York
  • Nationality:Pinoy on the Flip side

Posted 06 October 2007 - 09:38 PM

Comprendamenteplente! Raul is so right. FMA was never thought to be taught as an Organized Martial Art like JMA with "SET' Katas and Forms or CMA with books and poems to memorize the art.  Many of the arts are passed on from family and close friends and is mostly informal so terminology is just exactly - un-exact?

As Raul pointed out it's Blah , blah, blah - so informal a training session that no importance to terminology is offred- JUST THE ACT ITSELF.

So if our Manongs puts credence to this , then why the big deal about proper terminology or Historical correctness? Looks to me that the action is the focus which is what has been passed on.

Do you question the action being done to you? If you like it probably not so why question the terms? It's just a label as a point of refference that is made up on the spot.

I remember learning from a Cebuana some stuff here in the US and the terminologies were in Bisaya / tagalog and it was nothing more than calling out what was being done. To most of the students who were nto Pinoy it sounded exotic but to me it was funny as hell.

"sipa sa bayag" - siko sa labi"  " tusok sa mata" - "ISumbag ang itlog"

#17 artvilla

artvilla

    Mag-aaral (Student)

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 59 posts
  • Nationality:filipino
  • Group Affiliation(s):ptk training in florida

Posted 06 October 2007 - 10:24 PM

these terms were developed to provide a more structured delivery to the wetern students. we as filipinos already know, we learn by doing and feeling the flow. the western way is very technical that they seem to have to disect everything to the most intricate detail it becomes segmentally chopped into little pieces and labelled with terminology you get lost in translation, it then becomes less imteresting . parang spoon feeding ang nangyari. the pinoy way is , oh ganito ! follow me , you watch you practice, you watch again and keep on fine tuning it until you get the flow. that is how i have learned to develop. not much attention to terms but rather movement and its effectiveness in relation to delivering the intended strike. does it really matter what you call these moves. I have watched some silat moves and kuntao moves that are similar to fma techniques i was not concerned what it was called i just found it interesting that had some similarities with my  fma techniques. so the most important thing I learned in my fma journey is finding that balance between knowledge and skill" repetiton is the mother of learning"(Dr. Ariston Estrada).

#18 bayani

bayani

    Dalubhasang Guro (Expert Teacher)

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,862 posts
  • Location:Rochester New York
  • Nationality:Pinoy on the Flip side

Posted 06 October 2007 - 10:34 PM

Well said art!

#19 nosyac

nosyac

    All Filipino BLADE Society

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,971 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Florida
  • Interests:Computers...
  • Nationality:Cebuano (Filipino)
  • Group Affiliation(s):Filipino Metal Alchemist (FMA)

Posted 07 October 2007 - 12:01 AM

Wow, galing ni Arthur!

So... names aren't that important to a certain degree... besides, names won't matter in real fights.

#20 stickmeister

stickmeister

    Mag-aaral (Student)

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 47 posts
  • Nationality:Fil-Am
  • Group Affiliation(s):Modern Arnis

Posted 07 October 2007 - 06:03 AM

names only matter to forum/keyboard/internet warriors.

as long as theyve convinced the other guy that this is the right term they think theyve already won a fight lol.

thats why i dont listen to *cough*FMA forum scholars*cough*. they think they know all but in reality they cant really hold the stick.

#21 nosyac

nosyac

    All Filipino BLADE Society

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,971 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Florida
  • Interests:Computers...
  • Nationality:Cebuano (Filipino)
  • Group Affiliation(s):Filipino Metal Alchemist (FMA)

Posted 07 October 2007 - 06:20 AM

QUOTE (stickmeister @ Oct 7 2007, 02:03 AM)
thats why i dont listen to *cough*FMA forum scholars*cough*. they think they know all but in reality they cant really hold the stick.


Why is this line so familiar, I can't figure out who wrote it... hmmmm thinking.gif

#22 Matawguro

Matawguro

    Dalubhasang Guro (Expert Teacher)

  • Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,723 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Quezon City, Philippines
  • Nationality:Filipino
  • Group Affiliation(s):FMA Forum

Posted 07 October 2007 - 06:38 AM

QUOTE (nosyac @ Oct 7 2007, 02:20 PM)
QUOTE (stickmeister @ Oct 7 2007, 02:03 AM)
thats why i dont listen to *cough*FMA forum scholars*cough*. they think they know all but in reality they cant really hold the stick.


Why is this line so familiar, I can't figure out who wrote it... hmmmm thinking.gif

Something along the same lines was supposedly said by Tatang Ilustrisimo.
Robbie Trinidad
FMA Forum Administrator
Quezon City, Philippines

#23 Matawguro

Matawguro

    Dalubhasang Guro (Expert Teacher)

  • Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,723 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Quezon City, Philippines
  • Nationality:Filipino
  • Group Affiliation(s):FMA Forum

Posted 07 October 2007 - 07:02 AM

QUOTE (Karl @ Oct 7 2007, 02:27 AM)
How about when u teach, do you say this is whatever in this one is another name or you just do it and thats it???
Im Talking about the terminology.....
Thanks

In other martial arts, lessons start with some signal word like "Yoi" or something like that. In FMA, lessons start with the teacher uttering three words...

"Paluin mo ako." (Hit me.)

The teacher will then demonstrate the technique then will ask the student to do the same.

(On a side note, this is why when a teacher says "Paluin mo ako," the first thought that enters my mind is "Damn, this is going to hurt.")

A lot of it is "do as I do". This is usually the case in backyard training sessions. Terminology usually isn't need. In case it is needed, generic terms are used like "overhead strike", "upward strike", "this block", "that block".

There are however teachers who use terminology a lot. Usually, these are teachers who have experience teaching in a structured environment like a university, or is a member of an FMA organization implementing a standard curriculum. In the later case, structured curriculi are needed to be able to teach in schools.

As previously mentioned, foreigners' penchant for terminology also forces teachers to hunt down or adapt certain words are proper terminology.
Robbie Trinidad
FMA Forum Administrator
Quezon City, Philippines

#24 Matawguro

Matawguro

    Dalubhasang Guro (Expert Teacher)

  • Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,723 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Quezon City, Philippines
  • Nationality:Filipino
  • Group Affiliation(s):FMA Forum

Posted 07 October 2007 - 11:36 AM

Just to illustrate of different teachers use terminology, let me describe how some teachers used terms when I studied under them either long term or during short seminars:

Sioc Glaraga (Kalaki Eskrima) - Very intensive in terminology. I am not kidding. Each technique can have more than one term associated with it (Estrella or Buhat Araw for the No. 1 strike), and every variation to a technique has it's own name (abanico, corto abanico, vuelta abanico).

Yuli Romo (Bahad Zu'Bu) - Lots of terminology (lots more if you ask). Not as much as Sioc Glaraga, but Sioc aknowledges Yuli as the source of a good number of the terms he uses.

Bob Silver Tabimina (Tabimina Balintawak) - The other side of the spectrum. Talked a lot during the seminar I attended but never uttered a single term. Check out the picnic vidoes and see if you hear him use any term. He mentioned amara, but only to say that his system didn't have it.

Bambit Dulay (Modern Arnis) - Medium amount of terminology with structured teaching which Modern Arnis is known for. The amount of terms used is enough to instruct students on what to do.

Jerry Evangilisan (Dekiti Tersia Serradas) - Not much terminology. Went straight to drills.
Robbie Trinidad
FMA Forum Administrator
Quezon City, Philippines

#25 dyak_stone

dyak_stone

    Mandirigma (Warrior)

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 398 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Metro Manila
  • Nationality:Filipino
  • Group Affiliation(s):Kali Arnis Martial Arts Organization (KAMAO)

Posted 07 October 2007 - 12:44 PM

My mom is Ibanag, and she and my grandma still speak Ibanag at home. They both have no idea what pagkalikali is. I've spoken to other relatives (cousins of my grandparents, some who still live up there in Tuguegarao City, Cagayan Province), and that yielded the same result.

Even though I'm currently doubtful, I'm still not sure whether pagkalikali is part of the Ibanag vocabulary. It may exist or may not exist in some other part of Cagayan north.

No conclusions here, just sharing what I know so far.

#26 Karl

Karl

    Dalubhasang Guro (Expert Teacher)

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,135 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Germany, Chile.....
  • Nationality:Chilean-German
  • Group Affiliation(s):DTS

Posted 07 October 2007 - 03:22 PM

QUOTE (Raul @ Oct 6 2007, 10:17 PM)
I say.. "Its called blah blah. Master called it blah blah. The Old Masters called it blah blah. I call it blah blah. Others call it blah blah. They think its blah blah but its not. You can call it blah blah if you want but strictly and technically speaking, you should call it blah blah because you know it is blah blah and not blah blah." "Comprende?!"
      

Blah Blah Blah  comprendo completamente Raul….…
              
QUOTE (Matawguro @ Oct 7 2007, 08:02 AM)
QUOTE (Karl @ Oct 7 2007, 02:27 AM)
How about when u teach, do you say this is whatever in this one is another name or you just do it and thats it???
Im Talking about the terminology.....
Thanks

In other martial arts, lessons start with some signal word like "Yoi" or something like that. In FMA, lessons start with the teacher uttering three words...
"Paluin mo ako." (Hit me.)
The teacher will then demonstrate the technique then will ask the student to do the same.
(On a side note, this is why when a teacher says "Paluin mo ako," the first thought that enters my mind is "Damn, this is going to hurt.")
A lot of it is "do as I do". This is usually the case in backyard training sessions. Terminology usually isn't need. In case it is needed, generic terms are used like "overhead strike", "upward strike", "this block", "that block".
There are however teachers who use terminology a lot. Usually, these are teachers who have experience teaching in a structured environment like a university, or is a member of an FMA organization implementing a standard curriculum. In the later case, structured curriculi are needed to be able to teach in schools.
As previously mentioned, foreigners' penchant for terminology also forces teachers to hunt down or adapt certain words are proper terminology.


I ask  not because I care about terminology, my Teacher almost never use it also (in the PH) and for me is good so because it will take a long time to learn it correctly  if ever (in the right way without making mistakes and calling egs tomatoes and tomatoes chicken)….I ask because I always wonder and ask me where they took all the terminology …(If I visit a forum here in Germany they will be talking about sumbrada Redondo and hubd hubud drill and than thats ok maybe but you will see a lot of other words…..and seems the more words you know better you are….
Im happy the way I’m learning it without terminology……just staright to the point.
Be True To Yourself

#27 bayani

bayani

    Dalubhasang Guro (Expert Teacher)

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,862 posts
  • Location:Rochester New York
  • Nationality:Pinoy on the Flip side

Posted 08 October 2007 - 04:25 AM

Hi Karl,

So now you can see that all the specific terminologies were created for organized teaching invented by the instructors specific to their system which as you can see by now is not of importance to Pinoys from the homeland.  This lack of importance to labeling leads to careless use of terms "colgate for toothpaste, Coke for Softdrink, Kali Arnis eskrima... wink.gif

How many true organized schools are there in FMA in the Philippines? Sure we have organizations but are classes taught with specific terms, set forms to be learned with specific curicula for progression to be tested and given levels of rank? Kindly let me know cause this would be quite informative.

The westernized way is to label to be able to define so now you see and should be able to know that  as you said "and seems the more words you know better you are…"  now should be  absolutely untrue. There are many internet warriors who dont even train and have no skill  but are a full of information.

#28 sangot

sangot

    El Komedyante

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,889 posts
  • Group Affiliation(s):"Laging nasa Likod"

Posted 08 October 2007 - 08:34 AM

last saturday at the end of our training session
i ask one of my student to grab his ginunting (naks parang totoo  laugh.gif )
He's from Finland a former Inosanto Blend Student

he ask me what kind of Sumbrada we will be doing
i replied: "we will do the whatever sumbrada"    biggrin.gif

he knows more FMA terminology than me  laugh.gif
Manong Sangot
"Laging Takot"

#29 Karl

Karl

    Dalubhasang Guro (Expert Teacher)

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,135 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Germany, Chile.....
  • Nationality:Chilean-German
  • Group Affiliation(s):DTS

Posted 08 October 2007 - 11:11 AM

QUOTE (bayani @ Oct 8 2007, 05:25 AM)
Hi Karl,
So now you can see that all the specific terminologies were created for organized teaching invented by the instructors specific to their system which as you can see by now is not of importance to Pinoys from the homeland.  This lack of importance to labeling leads to careless use of terms "colgate for toothpaste, Coke for Softdrink, Kali Arnis eskrima... wink.gif

How many true organized schools are there in FMA in the Philippines? Sure we have organizations but are classes taught with specific terms, set forms to be learned with specific curicula for progression to be tested and given levels of rank? Kindly let me know cause this would be quite informative.
The westernized way is to label to be able to define so now you see and should be able to know that  as you said "and seems the more words you know better you are…"  now should be  absolutely untrue. There are many internet warriors who dont even train and have no skill  but are a full of information.


Hi Bayani, of course is untrue... I agree butone thing and Im not talking about me coz I dont know as I say before any terminology and Im far to be a good practitioner but I loved anyway and I try my best..No what I want to say is that there are also many (talking about europe) guys here that knows a lot of terminology for one reason or another (its the way they like it) and they are very good FMA lers......we cannot put all in one can would be unfair.... smile.gif

Quote Sangot
last saturday at the end of our training session
i ask one of my student to grab his ginunting (naks parang totoo  )
He's from Finland a former Inosanto Blend Student
he ask me what kind of Sumbrada we will be doing
i replied: "we will do the whatever sumbrada"  
he knows more FMA terminology than me  

Hehehe Sangot thats funny I guess it happends to many of you there in the PH.... biggrin.gif
Be True To Yourself

#30 nosyac

nosyac

    All Filipino BLADE Society

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,971 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Florida
  • Interests:Computers...
  • Nationality:Cebuano (Filipino)
  • Group Affiliation(s):Filipino Metal Alchemist (FMA)

Posted 08 October 2007 - 08:03 PM

I wouldn't be surprised if some names popped out and said, it's the name of the drill... okay, great!  Can we practice it?  lol.